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17

May
2013

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In Knowledge
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By PBJ

Long Distant Relationships and Abuse

On 17, May 2013 | No Comments | In Knowledge, Resources | By PBJ

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With long distance relationships becoming more common, we hear more and more about the various successes and failures that come with the territory. Most of the time this option is not by choice. Careers, school and family are just a few of the factors that keep lovers whispering sweet nothings into phones instead of each other’s ears. But if you think a relationship is doomed because of distance, think again. According to stats compiled by the Center for the Study of Long-Distance Relationships (yes, there really is such a thing), the myth that most long-distance relationships fail is just that: a myth. The reality is that more couples are making it work than you might think. Over one million couples are living in separate U.S. cities today, and another 700,000 LDR couples are actually married.

However LDRs tend to create unique problems of their own, especially when abuse is called into question. Long distance relationships can become abusive just as any other relationship could. A video called “Emotional Consequences of Long-Distance Relationship,” by Dr. Paul Vehorn explains that such relationships are likely to have “neurotic responses.” He explains that this is most likely caused by one or both partners feeling out of control and particularly vulnerable because of the separation.

Beware of the warning signs of emotional abuse. These are the same in long-distance relationships as relationships without any distance, and include name calling, constant and baseless accusations of unfaithfulness, threats, manipulative behaviors, constant calling or texting, and control a partners time isolating them from friends and family.

If you are in a LDR, it is important to be aware of the warning signs of abuse. Long distance relationships can be rewarding and full of love, but the added stresses often put pressure on both partners leading to unknown and unforeseen consequences.

– Meagan Traylor

If you or someone you love is being abused in a long-distance or traditional relationship, please seek help:

Here are some resources…

SPAN 24-hr Crisis and Information Hotline: 303.444.2424

MESA 24-hr Sexual Assault Hotline: 303.443.7300

Safe2Tell hotline: 1(877) 542-7233

National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline: 1.866.331.9474

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